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are packing up and getting ready to move. u.n. spokespersons say about half of their foreign employees will leave the country. >> they have assessed the situation and decided to reduce the presence of international staff in damascus due to conditions. >> motor shells landed near a hotel housing u.n. staff damaging the building and a u.n. vehicle. he says about half of 100 foreign staff members will move to lebanon or egypt. as those employees pull out the secretary general is sending team to investigate allegations by syrian forces. they say they used chemical weapons near the northern city of aleppo. he hopes the team will not consistent only of u.s. and european investigators. >>> rebel forces are now in control of the african capital. both sides signed a cease-fire? january. the rebels broke the agreement last week when they entered the capital. they took control of the city. their leader named himself interim president. they have announcdenounced the for breaking the cease-fire. the u.n. secretary general is calling for the rule of law to return as soon as possible. he says he's de
so far. >> a former child soldier, one of the so-called lost boys of sudan has come to the u.n. to add his voice to the debate. he says nations must speak out against the arms trade by signing this treaty. >> silence in itself is violence. if you know, if you're turning a blind eye of any situation, you actually are committing a crime. those are committing the atrocities and those turning a blind eye on it. here they have the power to turn everything around. >> the big question being asked in the other doers of the u.n., what positions will they take? they're keeping their card close to their chest. eight months ago when the treaty was lost on the table, the u.s. postponed things saying they needed more time to study the details. there will be 10 days of hard negotiations. if a treaty is to be signed, it has to happen before the end of this month. james baze, al jazeera, at the united nations. >> let's take a closer look at the flow of the international weapons trade. we begin with the biggest exporters. nearly a 1/3 of weapons worldwide come from the united states where russia
't want to make it worse. the u.n. has said, the u.s. secretary joe has said the introduction o of more weapons industry is adequate counterproductive or not will lead to a resolution for special representative brahimi called for renewed diplomatic initiative bring the warring party to negotiating table. can the prime minister set out what steps you a cake government is taking to support the u.n. and advancing this initiative? >> we are taking specific steps to help the u.n. with his initiative and try to achieve a diplomatic solution would transition at the top of the regime is worthwhile pursuing. that is why we have detailed talks with the russian foreign and defense ministers in the last week. i would just make one of the point about the issue of the arms embargo, because i felt sitting about the european council chamber there was a slight similarity between some of the arguments that were being made about not putting more weapons into syria that seem to be very familiar to the discussions we had about bosnia and the appalling events that followed. and in my view it is better to be
. andrew simmons, al jazeera. our u.n. correspondent spoke to us about the security situation in the city. >> it is a little bit calm in the neighborhood we are in. we are in the u.n. compound about 4 kilometers north of the city center. was early in the morning. entered the city fairly quickly and easily. the sporadic shooting and fighting has been going on and throughout the day and into the evening as well. they took over the presidential palace earlier this morning. the former president has left the country with his family. he is in congo. there has been an announcement by the senate, coalition -- seneca coalition, naming their former minister of defense, as the new president. the situation is rather precarious grip most residents are in their homes. houses have been looted. offices have been looted. the u.n. promises, -- premises, ngo premises, private communications, banks, pretty much everything has been looted. there have even been reports of the hospital being used, the pediatric hospital. this has been done by combination of armed elements, as well as neighborhoods, residents ta
for first class tickets for u.n. employees. what? i don't fly first class. i don't. shut the u.n. down, stop funding it. we need more aptds in manhattan. >> we spend a lot of the u.n. budget from the u.s. taxpayer. wayne, what's your one more thing? >> well, i like aon. a long time holding, very good in a recovering economy, look at that. >> what do they do? >> they make air conditioning equipment and that's why -- and in a modular way so it can be expanded when you're in a commercial air conditioning you can add units to it along the way. >> what about ann? >> it's not one i'm looking at now. in fact, i'm looking at these banks and there is talk of them collapsing in cyprus. many are doing well like in japan. japan's banks collapsed but it was 20 years ago. nom nomoro is strong. this is one that i own and i think it should be in your portfolio. >> what about u.s. banks? do we kind of made them very whole over the last couple years. >> and they are strong, bank of america not too far off from its high. financials here or abroad, maybe cyprus but not here at home. >> we'll leave it there. and
everything in the press that has been written, and they feel that the november trip to the u.n. was so successful that they are willing to go to the icc. when you say that israel may build this bottleneck area linking north and south, they say, fine. the more palestinians you talk to who believe that it is either final status or bust, and buss means the u.n., and not interested in any sort of coordinated unilateral agreement, it is a dirty word there, you are really seeing confidence. i personally hope the president in his stay over there is able to talk to the president over there and speak to them about the limitations of that strategy two could go to the icc. israelis say they're going to the icc. that could tie them up for years in legal proceedings. i do not see how any of this brings peace. i'm concerned about it. i'm also concerned about decision making, i'm concerned about the isolation of prime minister fayyat. the palestinian press does not report on his activities anymore. on the one hand, the good news is that more money has arrived lately. since obama is coming, of course
attack damaged a hotel and a u.n. truck. the temporarily mod some damascus based staff to beirut and cairo and has asked all other u.n. personnel in the country to work from home until further note. the fighting in syria, damascus, has escalated in recent months. meanwhile, a bomb attack reportedly injured a rebel leader who was one of the federal to call for the syrian people to rise up against the syrian president. activists say somebody put a bomb in his car, and whoever that somebody is it on the loose and they had to amputate the guy's right leg. in another blow to the rebels, the president of the council has quit. jonathan hunt is with us. the opposition seems to be in chaos in terms of civilian leadership. >> civilian and military. the founder of the free syrian army is the guy who has apparently suffered serious injuries, perhaps even losing a leg, in this car bomb attack. that is a major blow to the unity of the army itself. he has been seen generally as a very effective general. his effectiveness now is obviously going to be in question. on top of that, you have the res
at least he's not going to go to the u.n.-- which he's now entitled to, whether it's the international criminal court or other agencies-- and keep pushing this unilateral recognition agenda. so nobody who's made that connection publicly or even privately to us but that is the kind of thing that's being looked at and i think quietly encouraged but then what the president kept saying today is pretty quickly when the talks start it can't be around these peripheral issues. it's got to be about security and borders. and once you settle those, the other issues go away like settlements. borders issue will settle the settlements issue. >> brown: very briefly margaret. even today while the president is there you have rockets coming in from gaza. is that seen as having any immediate impact or is that just more a sense of difficult these are very much still out there. >> i think it's the latter, jeff. if you had big demonstrations from the west bank that would be different but in fact it helps the president prove his point which is that the palestinian authority in the west bank has been doing a
are not between doing nothing and doing everything. if the president moved more swiftly and not gone to the u.n. three times, and had a mother may i situation which the russians of course blocked, we might have been able to prevent an early -- a long, rather, prolonged fight and now we have 5,000 jihadis all overseer yeah. had we moved more swiftly to drop the preposterous positions and, to aid and outreach and secular elements early not we wouldn't be in a situation where we have 5,000 jihadis and the lesson is not never do anything, the answer is, american leadership is crucial in that part of the region. that part of the world. now, with regard to turkey and israel, i sure hope that netanyahu got something good for this. what he did was apologize for defending israel. the u.n. of all places, passed a report, put out a report, saying that israel was justified in self-defense and justified -- >> quickly, was the three -- three years ago, a turkish ship with peace people and adriati a tried to breach the blockade and to reach the palestinians and, israelis killed people. >> and people were ther
specifically? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. the constructed in many ways. physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. after 10 years of war in iraq we find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john kerry's visit today, the tensions between the united states and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to t
to the u.n. and a fox news contributor. general jack keane is also with us, a four-star retired general and former chief of staff of the u.s. army and a fox news military analyst. aaron david miller is a former advisor to six secretaries of state. he is also the author of, the much too promised land. aaron, let's start with you. this meeting has been written about, much-discussed in the united states. why now? why now for president obama to visit israel? >> oh, i think it is the intersection frankly of politics and policy. obama helped create his own israel problem and not that the prime minister of israel didn't air ba his fair share of the responsibility but the fact these two, probably with the exception of david ben guron and dwight d. eisenhower had most dysfunctional relationship between any american president and israeli prime minister. the president made a political calculation and he was vulnerable and exposed on this he had to take care of old business. too many people thought he was somehow hostile and adversary of the state of the israel. that coincides with policy on two is
spoke before the u.n. conference on the arms trade treaty. he refrained from mentioning the u.s. directly, but he criticized the country for continuing the development of nuclear weapons. >> at the front of the modernization is the largest nuclear weapon state who has listed certain countries as targets. with increased -- >> ri said such increased nuclear blackmail has compelled his country to adopt the same preemptive strike policy. the u.s. delegation did not exercise its right to reply and disregarded the condemnation from north korea. >>> japan is set to sanction a north korean bank. the u.s. treasury secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence travelled to tokyo to seek cooperate from japan. he met with them on tuesday. he explained the u.s. decision last week to ban the foreign trade bank of north korea in engaging in transactions with the north korean bang. it's said to be effective to a certain extent. but each country can prohibit only financial institutions from doing business with a north korean bank. cohen is also visiting china and south korea this week. >>
at the speed of hertz. >>> welcome back to "around the world." this week 193 countries at the u.n. will consider a global treaty to limit the trade of everything from ak-47 assault rifles to hand grenades. >> the u.n. says small arms are flowing way too easily across borders and landing in the hands of gangs, rebels, pirates and terrorists. >> the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says the weapons are fueling armed conflicts, crime and violations of human rights. >> no kidding. a rare public appearance today from britain's queen elizabeth who's been a bit unwell lately accompanied by her husband prince phillip and katharine. >> they are celebrating 150th anniversary and earlier this month the 86-year-old monarch was admitted to the hospital with a stomach bug. and since her release the palace has limited her schedule. >> good to see her out and about though. >>> now check this out. it's a bowl that was sold for $2.2 million at an auction in new york on tuesday. >> wow. it's a rare piece from china that's about 1,000 years old. oh, my goodness. it looks very delicate. the previous
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
't true and they sent out surrogates like our u.n. ambassador susan rice to parrott falsehoods. so this is a continuing conspiracy on the american people to hide these people and now they feel intimidated, the very heros who helped save lives and their lives were in danger and they're injured and they fear their government? and this is an absolute outrage and i believe the senator's allegations not only are true, but i think he's the type of person who can get to the bottom of it and let the people speak to make sure they understand fully what happened. >> they'll try. our own jenna lee interviewed jay carney on friday and asked him whether the white house prevented or attempt to go prevent any of the folks from speaking. here is mr. carney's response. >> and first of all, i have no knowledge of this story, secondly, i'm sure that the white house is not preventing anyone from speaking. >> so we have him saying, i'm not familiar with the story and i'm sure we're not and lindsey graham saying i have spoken with some of the survivors and telling you that they, as they put it, have bee
possible, but necessary. even as the u.n. launched an investigation into reports that chemical weapons were used in syria last week. andrea mitchell, nbc news, amman. >>> and it was the kind of meeting not witnessed in modern times. a get-together in italy today between two men who have worn the title pope. pope francis paid a visit to his predecessor benedict xvi at castel gandolfo the papal retreat where benedict has retired. francis -- pope francis told benedict, we are brothers. the two men prayed together with the vatican spokesman calling it a moment of great communion in the church. >>> a well-known russian tycoon who amassed great wealth after the fall of the soviet union was found dead today in england. boris berezovsky was a close ally of former president boris yeltsin. in return for backing yeltsin he was able to buy former state assets at bargain prices. he also helped vladimir putin rise to power but later had a falling-out with putin and moved to england. the circumstances of his death were unclear. berezovsky was 67 years old. >>> back in this country the evidence appears to
-type force. he is going to the u.n. he is looking for the french to take a lot of the lead. he is going to be -- but nobody, even with both syria and with iran, there is no nobody particularly at the pentagon who is really wanting to do this right now. and barack obama least of all. chris: michael. >> chris, this poses problems, the perception which i think is accurate of our wearyness causes problems particularly in iran. people don't believe that this president really is willing to follow through on the use of force because they think that his head is still looking back at iraq. someone who spoke to him recently told me a few days ago that he has said about syria, words to the effect of "i know how i get in. tell me how i get out. i don't know how to get out." he is still thinking of what we got into unexpectedly in iraq, the unintended consequences of american action. it's a defining thing for him. chris: a sense of wisdom. let me ask you about this column. in terms of republican politics, and speak for that if you can, that they know that george w bush is basically identified comple
, and unfortunately the increase in civilian casualties are going to be the price paid for that. heather: the u.n. now says that they are going to go in, they're going to investigate this. in fact, three separate occasions where chemical weapons have allegedly been used in syria. but what type of access will they get and how will we even be able to prove this? >> well, i'm skeptical about that to be sure. this is a rogue regime. assad will only do what is is in his interest and his singular focus is preservation of his regime and to stay in power so he will do nothing to undermine that. if he has to lie or deny with the u.n. inspectors he will certainly do it but the u.n. inspectors, if they're competent like the ones we had it iraq they will certainly know what assad is up to and be able to reveal he is not giving them the kind of access they should have. heather: finally, what the is greatest danger if in fact syria has the chemical weapons and they're using them? secondly, president obama said this would be a game-changer. those were his words if in fact it is proven chemical weapons are being used
. >> the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in their words. it backed the u.n. diplomacy and bet on moscow to play a productive role. none of this worked. >> netanyahu's intelligence director said it's clear that the chemical weapons were used in syria. the chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes that chemical weapons were used by the regime as a caveat. >> i like the see forensic evidence. >> embassy shuttered for year hedged on the chemical weapons. >> i can't tell you what happened. i can tell you we have a large team of people working on it. >> the syrian regime lost control with turkey and iraq. when they visit on friday, they are bracing for the possibility that the civil war could spread there. >> ed henry traveling with the president in jerusalem. thank you. now to iran, both leaders made clear they do not intend to allow the republic to get nuclear weapons. chief washington correspondent james rosen reports tonight there seems to be differences. >> they are not conveying how much divides them. >> i am convinced that the president is determined to pr
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
today said that the u.n. will conduct an investigation into the matter and said such a move would amount to crimes against humanity. now, yesterday, president obama said if an investigation shows the syrians did indeed use chemical weapons, weapons of mass destruction that would be a game-changer. and now it appears support in congress is sprouting for some kind of u.s. military action. to wit: a joint letter to the president, the chairman of the senate armed services committee, michigan democrat senator carl levin and the arizona republican senator john mccain today called for limited air strikes on certain syrian regime targets namely syrian air bases and missile batteries. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is live at the united nations for us tonight. jonathan? this sounds like a significant u.n. investigation. >> well, yes, it certainly has the potential to be significant in that it could be the first independent, unbiased investigation into the several claims we have so far heard that chemical weapons have been used during the syrian civil war. on the other hand, remem
for defending israel. the u.n. of all places passed a report, put out a report saying that israel was justified in self-defense and they were justified in in. >> chris: three years ago a turkish ship with people and aid activists tried to breach the israeli block kade of gaza to bring supplies to the palestinians in gaza and the israelis raided it and ended up killing nine of the people. >> that was not just peace and humanitarian people. they had weapons and attacked threw israeli soldeddiers into the sea. the u.n. issued a report saying israel had a right to defend itself and maintain that block kade. now, the president leaned on israel to issue some type of apology. did they get something in return? i hope so. otherwise it looks like obama is leaning on the israelis. bad signal to the rest of the region. >> chris: with all of the focus on syria and iran there was relatively little talk about the prospects for a peace deal between the israelis and palestinians but the president did address it in this speech in jerusalem. >> iit is possible. it is possible. i'm not saying it is guaranteed. i c
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
to be here at cooper union and i am delighted of the sponsorship of n.y.u. which i am very familiar with so i feel at home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact you braved the weather and the elements for three yesterday was so beautiful. what happened today? this is new york but it can change so dramatically and so quickly. i feel very at home because i have an early experience of learning about human rights. very early. growing up in the west of ireland wedged between two brothers and older and two brothers younger i had to be interested in equality and human rights but using my elbows to assert myself but as i try to explain in the book but that was not the norm but growing up in ireland where girls and women knew their place in the home or as a 90 or possibly to become a writer or a artist or a musician. i was very aware this you seem to have much more options even though my parent's repeated i had the same opportunities that my brothers had and they would support me in that. of the six years of the boarding school in dublin, i realize the options were not very exciting. most of
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
viewed as contentious visits by iran's president to new york. the visits to the u.n. were often laced with intrigue and tension and one had an errant gunshot mixed in. according to a new book that tells of an incident in new york involving iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad. the book said it happened in 20 2006. but the author now acknowledges it was in 2007. the book says when u.s. secret service personnel were standing by in or near their vehicles at a staging area in new york, a secret service agent in an apparent accident discharged his shotgun as iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad was loading his motorcade. no one was hurt and co-author mark said ahmadinejad didn't come close to getting hit with the bullet. but -- >> my understanding is from the bush administration officials, who looked into it at the time, is that ahmadinejad was aware of it. certainly heard the shot. and, you know, was surprised by it. but kind of looked asconce a little bit anded walked and got into his car. >> reporter: he said iranian security personnel were nearby as well and noticed it. he says that'
at the u.n. last fall. iran maintains its nuclear program is solely for peaceful energy production. as the arab uprisings convulse the president viewed a missile battery of the iron dome defense system-- heavily financed by the u.s., which knocked scores of rockets from the sky during brief november war with gaza. the president's remarks heavy with allusions to millenia of jewish history in the holy land and a nod to the broad purposes of his trip. >> across this region the winds of change bring both promise and peril. so i see this visit as an opportunity to reaffirm the unbreakable bonds between our nations, to restate america's unwavering commitment to israel's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> warner: he was referring to another focus of this visit: to listen to what israeli and palestinian leaders say they're willing to do to revive the stalled peace process between them. later at a press conference at the prime minister's jerusalem residence, the president was asked about yesterday's possible chemical weapons attack in northern
that it wasn't, when the people who were watching this knew it was a terrorist attack. >>anna: u.n. ambassador susan rice blamed the deadly attack on a video. the f.b.i. investigating how a man was able to pose as a pilot and gain ablg ses to the -- access to a u.s. airways cockpit flight in philadelphia. the man had on an air france uniform and i.d. and ended up in the jump seat behind the captain. he was caught when he failed to show real credentials. the airlines says no passengers were ever in danger. those are your headlines this friday morning. >>steve: meanwhile president obama on his way now to bethlehem. he visited israel's memorial to the holocaust victims a short time ago during the third day of his first presidential trip to israel. >>brian: we're live in jerusalem following the trip. hey, leland. >> good morning, brian. the issue from the president is not so much what he's saying. he's saying the same thing in terms of the substantive issues about iran and about a palestinian state. but more about how he is saying it. he's going out of his way to show great empathy towards the isr
, we're on the highway. the israelis are ice rated. we went to the u.n. we'll go to the international criminal court. i feel they think there's no reason to compromise. i feel the open sesame is just to get the basics. if the president can get the palestinians and the israelis to talk about two states for two people it might sound like a cliche but i think it's the one thing that could have an impact on this because it deals with... does each side recognize that they are palestinian and jewish nationalists movements? the israelis are willing to do it but the palestinians are not. >> brown: we're going to focus tomorrow specifically on the palestinians. i'm wondering on the israeli side, is it fair to say that their real focus now as a security issue is much more on iran than on palestinian relations? >> iran i think in the exit polls only rated 10% of the people said that it was the top priority in the israeli election. it really didn't play in the election campaign. i think it does remain a threat, an existential threat. as the president said it's a year away before they get the bomb
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
to balance the scale. at this point, abbas has a u.n. resolution, about the only thing he has in his camp. he has no -- he's become a dependency, dependent upon foreign aid to sustain an ever-dwindling authority. they have become a police force governing the terrorists. allen, let me finish. they have become a police force governing the territories. but they've gotten no payment back. and this issue is bigger than the west bank. it's about palestinian nationhood, about the right of palestinians to have the same respect as a nation that israel demands for itself. and frankly, that's not on the table. i would say to you that what the u.s. has to do, when the president is done with this trip, come back, hopefully earning the confidence of the israeli people, trying to restore some confidence on the palestinian side, which is lost right now. and then refashion a middle east peace initiative that gives some hope to both sides. right now palestinians don't feel hope at all. >> okay. let me ask you both very quickly and i'll start with you, james zogby, very quickly, if i may. are you optimistic wit
here. we just learned that u.n. chief moon says the u.n. will conduct an investigation into the alleged chemical weapons use in syria. earlier this week syrian government and rebels accused each other of launching a deadly chemical attack, but there is no confirmation of those allegations. if true, it would be the first use of such weapons in the conflict. as the president said in israel yesterday, the use of chemical weapons is a game-changer. >>> the pentagon is considering plans for $150 million overhaul of the guantanamo bay detention facility. according to facilities, the multimillion dollar plan would include building a new dining hall, hospital and barracks for the guards. the proposal comes amid mounting signs of frustration from gitmo detainees. u.s. military officials confirm that the number of hunger strikes have tripled over the last two weeks from seven to 25. officials say no lives are in danger, but do acknowledge detainees are growing more frustrated. >> the detainees had -- and their attorneys presumably had great hope that the facility would be closed. and they were pa
in the u.n. or the international criminal court. >> we'll see whacomes out. and then john kerry is going to follow up on this. but i suspect that from the way that the wording is coming out there may be a softening of positions on both sides on this in terms of settlement. a restraining settlement activity. >> rose: and palestinian initiatives in the u.n.. >> right. >> rose: okay. the last one is empower secretary of state kerry. >> he hasn't done that yet. he really needs to do it because he's given this speech which has raised expectations sky-high about what the united states is going to do in the peace process. and if he doesn't back kerry up, because kerry is the one that is going to be doing it, kerry won't be able to succeed. >> my guess is knowing secretary kerry and knowing secretary clinton, that secretary kerry will give this because he passionately is interested in this more tension, individually on his own, than secretary clinton. >> he says it that the time, sorry, that the time for middlest envoy is over. >> he is a secretary that is widely prceived as being verylose to th
of state. >> absolutely. it echoed something that she said at the u.n. gay rights is human rights. this is a big moment this week, two big cases. a moment for the country to finally get on the right side of history. dr. king said that the history of to world is long but it always bends toward justice. a moment to look at the proposition 8 in california, and to declare it unconstitutional and also to repeal doma. these are two big cases. and it's going to have a major impact. >> terry, you cover the supreme court for us. it seems to put two justices especially in an interesting position, justice kennedy, the traditional swing vote for the justices. but maybe, even more chief justice john roberts, 58 years old, likely to be chief justice for a long time. you see how support for gay marriage has surged in the last year. even if he personally may be against it, he's likely to look and see, 10, 15 years, still sitting on the bench, it's going to be 70% support in the country. >> there's an institutional challenge to the court in the astonishing speed that the country has changed its mi
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